Spotlight & Giveaway: In Dog We Trust by Beth Kendrick

Posted January 10th, 2019 by in Blog, Spotlight / 35 comments

Today it is my pleasure to Welcome author Beth Kendrick to HJ!
Spotlight&Giveaway

 

Hi Beth and welcome to HJ! We’re so excited to chat with you about your new release, In Dog We Trust!

 

Please summarize the book for the readers here:

When Jocelyn Hillier is named legal guardian for the late Mr. Allardyce’s pack of pedigreed Labrador retrievers, her world is flipped upside down. She’s spent her entire life toiling in the tourism industry in Black Dog Bay and never expected to be living the pampered life of a seasonal resident in an ocean side mansion, complete with a generous stipend. But her new role isn’t without its challenges: The dogs (although lovable) are more high-maintenance than any Hollywood diva, the man she wants to marry breaks her heart, and she’s confronted at every turn by her late benefactor’s estranged son, Liam, who thinks he’s entitled to the inheritance left to the dogs. Jocelyn has worked too hard to back down without a fight, and she’s determined to keep her new fur family together.

This book has it all, you guys: intrigue, drama, scandal, betrayal…and shedding. So much shedding.
 

Please share the opening lines of this book:

“Why are you running like it’s your money or your life?”
Jocelyn Hillier’s runner’s high plummeted as she answered her cell phone midstride and heard her mother’s voice.

 

Please share a few Fun facts about this book…

  • This story was inspired by a National Geographic Kids article about the world’s richest pets. The article featured a photo of a German Shepherd who had inherited millions of dollars upon the death of a doting owner. The article mentioned that the dog’s trustee was able to buy, like, sports cars and Rolexes on the dog’s behalf. I was fascinated and started Googling inheritance laws, and 400 pages later, here we are.
  • An estate attorney filled me in on the finer points of inheritance law as it relates to pets. I was worried he’d think it was a crazy idea, but he really got into it and sent details from real-life cases my way. I assumed it would be dry and boring, but it was surprisingly juicy. People get very specific about their posthumous directives for their pets.
  • I also went to a bunch of dog shows to watch conformation competitions and talk shop with the owners and handlers. I spent several Saturday mornings shamelessly ingratiating myself with dogs I’d just met. These are the sacrifices I make for my craft.

 

Please tell us a little about the characters in your book. As you wrote your protagonist was there anything about them that surprised you?

Jocelyn and her mother, Rachel, are longtime local residents in a tourist town that’s becoming increasingly posh and unaffordable. They run a linen supply company that stocks rental houses and hotel with towels and sheets, so they deal with other people’s dirty laundry all day—literally and figuratively. Jocelyn has spent her whole life feeling as though she’s on the outside looking in, and so when she finally gets to chance to join the inner circle of wealth and social influence, she has very mixed feelings. As does her mother. As does her blue-blooded boyfriend, who’s used to having more money and status than she does.

I love all of my protagonists, of course, but I always end up having a soft spot for the villains, schemers, and unrepentant grinches. In this book, I found myself sympathizing with Mr. Allardyce, who is basically the Ebeneezer Scrooge of the Delaware beaches. Yes, he’s surly and stingy and totally rude—but at least he’s upfront about it. And he treats his dogs like royalty, so he can’t be all bad. Plus, it was fun to read a bunch of upscale home and garden magazines and decorate his imaginary mansion.

 

What do you want people to take away from reading this book?

One of the themes in this book is “your money or your life” and I think most people can relate to the challenge of trying to balance family and work, obligation and opportunity, practicality and passion. Almost every character in this story is trying to heal and forgive while also protecting themselves from being hurt again, and we all struggle with that at some point.

 

Thanks for blogging at HJ!

 

Giveaway: Print copy of IN DOG WE TRUST by Beth Kendrick

 

To enter Giveaway: Please complete the Rafflecopter form and Post a comment to this Q: After the heroine of this book effectively inherits a huge amount of money and property, she experiences immediate differences in the way she is treated and perceived by others. How do you think your social, familial, and/or romantic relationships might be affected if you unexpectedly inherited tens of millions of dollars?

 
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Excerpt from In Dog We Trust:

Rachel touched Jocelyn’s arm. “I never wanted the high life.” She leveled her gaze. “I don’t need diamonds and trips to Paris to be happy.”
Rather than resuming their earlier squabble, Jocelyn agreed with her mother. “I know. It’s like you always said, having more just makes you want more.”
“That’s right.”
“I always think about that when I go to Mr. Allardyce’s house. He spent gobs of money to build it and fill it with furniture and art, and for what?” Jocelyn allowed a hint of annoyance to creep into her voice. “His house takes up some of the most beautiful beachfront property in town, and he only spends two months a year here. He spends most of his time in his even bigger mansion in Virginia, and no one else gets to enjoy the beach, and he has to pay for lawn maintenance and utilities and upkeep all year long. It’s very selfish. Not to mention environmentally irresponsible.”
“Preach it,” Rachel said.
“And it doesn’t make him happy. He’s the sourest sourpuss I’ve ever met. I’ve never heard him talk about his family, and I don’t think he has any friends.”
“His own dogs probably don’t even like him.”
“No, they do.” Jocelyn smiled. “That’s probably why he has three of them. They’re always happy to see him and they never want anything from him, except belly rubs and walks and food.”
“And he can’t even give them that,” Rachel pointed out. “He outsourced the walking and playing to you.”
“I’m telling you, if I had money, I wouldn’t waste it. I wouldn’t buy a giant empty house, hogging all the good views and natural resources for myself.”
“You say that, but money changes people.”
“Not me,” Jocelyn vowed.
“Uh huh. That’s what they all say—until they become one-percenters.”
“Try me,” Jocelyn said. “Give me an environmental disaster of a beach house and a bunch of cash I didn’t earn and I’ll give it all away.”
Famous last words.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.
 
 

Book Info:

When everything has gone to the dogs . . .

When Jocelyn Hillier is named legal guardian for the late Mr. Allardyce’s pack of pedigreed Labrador retrievers, her world is flipped upside down. She’s spent her entire life toiling in the tourism industry in Black Dog Bay and never expected to be living the pampered life of a seasonal resident in an ocean side mansion, complete with a generous stipend. But her new role isn’t without its challenges: The dogs (although lovable) are more high-maintenance than any Hollywood diva, the man she wants to marry breaks her heart, and she’s confronted at every turn by her late benefactor’s estranged son, Liam, who thinks he’s entitled to the inheritance left to the dogs.

Jocelyn has worked too hard to back down without a fight, and she’s determined to keep her new fur family together. As she strives to uphold the “Best in Show” standards her pack requires, Jocelyn finds love, family, and forgiveness in the most unexpected places.
 
 

Meet the Author:

Beth Kendrick is the author of Once Upon a Wine, Put a Ring On It, New Uses for Old Boyfriends, Cure for the Common Breakup, The Week Before the Wedding, The Lucky Dog Matchmaking Service, and Nearlyweds, which was turned into a Hallmark Channel original movie.
 
 
 

35 Responses to “Spotlight & Giveaway: In Dog We Trust by Beth Kendrick”

  1. ELF

    I always cynically think that if I ever won the lottery, I would suddenly hear from relatives I hadn’t heard from in years/decades, lol.

  2. Sonia

    I think it would definitely change a lot since I’m an introvert and I like to keep to myself. I think relatives and friends will pop out of the nowhere but then again I’m jaded:)

  3. John Smith

    “How do you think your social, familial, and/or romantic relationships might be affected if you unexpectedly inherited tens of millions of dollars?” My life and relationships would be exactly the same, except I would live in a beautiful historic mansion in Paris.

  4. John Smith

    “How do you think your social, familial, and/or romantic relationships might be affected if you unexpectedly inherited tens of millions of dollars?” Everything would be exactly the same, except in Paris. (I don’t know if this will *now* be a duplicate response, but I left a comment, clicked once, and it said I was making a duplicate response, so I’m trying again, because that was screwy.)

  5. janinecatmom

    I would probably disappear for a while. Only my parents would know I got some money because I would help them out. But those other family member who don’t want anything to do with me now, wouldn’t know anything about it. I can think of a few friends and family members who would probably be asking for money. If they don’t want anything to do with me now, they don’t deserve anything.

  6. laurieg72

    My immediate family and close friends I trust so I don’t think our relationships would change. I might want to gift them something. Romantic relationships, new friends I would have to tread carefully to see where their true motives lie. I think I’d be real careful of work place new friends and people coming to me for handouts.

  7. Debra Branigan

    How do you think your social, familial, and/or romantic relationships might be affected if you unexpectedly inherited tens of millions of dollars?

    Well, large amounts of money affect anything around it, so relationships would be definitely affected. I could see some negative effects (expected handouts) as well as positive ones like helping those in need.

  8. Ginger Connatser

    I think things would chance. You would have more people trying to be your friend.

  9. Teresa Williams

    Oh I inherited some money after my grandparents died .Property also.You wouldn’t believe what family would do to you to make sure they get more or the best of the things.People that weren’t in the will.They will meet their maker one day.I won a big lawsuit once and was used for it.

  10. Amy R

    How do you think your social, familial, and/or romantic relationships might be affected if you unexpectedly inherited tens of millions of dollars? Socially I think people would try to befriend me, familial I would probably see family more and romantically as I’ve been married for a lot of years I don’t see anything changing.

  11. Caro

    I’d say they’d act differently. Money changes things, changes people, even in your own family.

    That’s why I wouldn’t advertise it, lol.

  12. diannekc

    I think I would probably hear from a lot of people that I never hear from. I would also be really skeptical about people trying to suddenly be friends.

  13. holdenj

    I would like to think my close family/friends would be fine, but like winning the lottery, I bet people come out of the woodwork.

  14. Danielle Hammelef

    I think I would start to hear from lots of long-lost relatives hoping for money as well as groups asking for donations. But I don’t think my friends would treat me differently, in fact, I could treat them more with more frequent surprises to make them happy.

  15. Nicole (Nicky) Ortiz

    I would say my family and close friends would be the same. I’m sure there will be people who all of sudden want to be friends. I would be weary of any romantic interests that are met my way.

  16. rkcjmomma

    My husband and 4 kids would be the same! My parents, inlaws and siblings would try to use me for money and my friends would be the same as always!!

  17. erinf1

    I’d have to go into hiding 🙂 the estranged members of my extended family would suddenly love me to bits! Thanks for sharing! This sounds awesome!

  18. eawells

    I don’t know if it would change me or not but it would alleviate worries about affording things.

  19. Patricia B.

    The thing I would like lest of all would be all the friends and relatives -“long lost” and otherwise – showing up expecting me to give them money just because I had it. Every charitable organization would also be hounding us. I donate what I can now and would continue to do so. However, it would be because I wanted to not because I was asked to. To me the ideal way to acquire such a large amount would be anonymously. That way you could do what you like, give what you like, enjoy it, and not be harassed. It is so much more enjoyable to do something for someone when they don’t expect it or know who did it.

  20. Terrill R.

    I don’t think my family would change much and I would hope that friends wouldn’t, but that is unlikely. I know that jealousy and spite runs rampant in these situations.

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